Cat in the Rain

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Analysis of the short story by

Ernest Hemingway

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Method Guide to SEMINAR 3 in LITERARY ANALYSIS

For the 2-nd year students of the English Department

Compiled by
Candidate of Philology Shkuropat M.Y.

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(???°?®???®???®?« ??1 ?????¤ 28.08.09)

SEMINAR3

TOPIC: Characters. Ways of Characterization. Relating setting to the characters.
Subject of the story, theme/ idea, problem.
Analysis of the short story by Ernest Hemingway Cat in the Rain
Activity 1
? Revise the principles of literary analysis and the guiding questions for making analysis in the method guide ???THE LITERARY ANALYSIS: STEP BY STEP GUIDE???
? Read your notes to the LECTURES 2 and 3. Revise elements of the plot structure, the structural devices, types of narration and point of view, types of conflict, ways of characterization, forms of psychological description, types of setting, time and space.
? Read your notes to the LECTURE 4. Revise the subject of the story, theme/ idea, problem.
Activity 2
? Read the short story by Ernest Hemingway Cat in the Rain
? Study the analytical essays.
? Answer the questions.
Questions
1. Describe the plot of the story and also a structure. Can all the elements of the plot ( exposition, complication, crisis, climax and resolution) be observed in the story Where is the crisis of the story The climax
2. What type of narration and point of view is used in the story Whose point of view dominates in the story How do we know it Can we hear the authorial voice in the story
3. What does the description of the setting serve to
4. What is the subject of the story Is it the story about love for animals What seems to be the idea and the message of the story What type of conflict is observed
5. What literary devices (repetition, conversation, action) does the author use to describe the characters Does the hotel keeper belong to the main or subsidiary characters
6. What means of characterization (direct, indirect) does the author employ
7. What details of setting help to understand the problems in the relationship between the young couple Does the author discuss them directly
8. What key words are constantly repeated in the text What is the purpose of these repetitions What ideas do they help to convey
9. Comment on the way the author addresses the characters (by the first name, by the family name or by the social status) What effect does it produce Does the author sympathize the main character/ protagonist Does he accuse her husband
10. Comment on the title of the story. How does it gain extension by the end of the story Does the title gain any symbolic meaning
Activity 3 Write your own analytical essay on the story. (p.26)
[pic] by Ernest Hemingway

There were only two Americans stopping at the hotel. They did not know any of the people they passed on the stairs on their way to and from their room. Their room was on the second floor facing the sea. It also faced the public garden and war monument. There were big palms and green benches in the public garden. In the good weather there was always an artist with his easel. Artists liked the way the palms grew and the bright colors of the hotels facing the sea. Italians came from a long way off to look up at the war monument. It was made of bronze and glistened in the rain. It was raining. The rain dripped from the palm trees. Water stood in pools on the gravel paths. The sea broke in a long line in the rain.
The motor cars were gone from the square by the war monument. Across the square in the doorway of the cafe a waiter stood looking out at the empty square.
The American wife stood at the window looking out. Outside right under their window a cat was crouched under one of the dripping green tables. The cat was trying to make herself so compact that she would not be dripped on.
???I??™m going down and get that kitty,??? the American wife said.
???I??™ll do it,??? her husband offered from the bed.
???No, I??™ll get it. The poor kitty is out trying to keep dry under the table.???
The husband went on reading, lying propped up with the two pillows at the foot of the bed.
???Don??™t get wet,??? he said.
The wife went downstairs and the hotel owner stood up and bowed to her as she passed the office. His desk was at the far end of the office. He was an old man and very tall.
???Il piove,??? the wife said. She liked the hotelkeeper.
???Si, si, Signora, brutto tempo. It is very bad weather.???
He stood behind his desk in the far end of the dim room. The wife liked him. She liked the way he wanted to serve her. She liked the way he felt about being a hotel-keeper. She liked his old, heavy face and big hands.
Liking him she opened the door and looked out. It was raining harder. A man in a rubber cape was crossing the empty square to the cafe. The cat would be around to the right. Perhaps she could go along to the eaves. As she stood in the doorway an umbrella opened behind her. It was the maid who looked after their room.
???You must not get wet,??? she smiled, speaking Italian. Of course, the hotel-keeper had sent her.
With the maid holding the umbrella over her, she walked along the gravel path until she was under their window. The table was there, washed bright green in the rain, but the cat was gone. She was suddenly disappointed. The maid looked up at her.
???Ha perduto qualque cosa, Signora???
???There was a cat,??? said the American girl.
???A cat???
???Si, il gatto.???
???A cat??? the maid laughed. ???A cat in the rain???
???Yes,??? she said, ???under the table.??? Then, ???Oh, I wanted it so much. I wanted a kitty.???
When she talked English the maid??™s face tightened.
???Come, Signora,??? she said. ???We must get back inside. You will be wet.???
???I suppose so,??? said the American girl.
They went back along the gravel path and passed in the door. The maid stayed outside to close the umbrella. As the American girl passed the office, the padrone bowed from his desk. Something felt very small and tight inside the girl. The padrone made her feel very small and at the same time really important. She had a momentary feeling of being of supreme importance. She went on up the stairs. She opened the door of the room. George was on the bed reading.
???Did you get the cat??? he asked, putting the book down.
???It was gone.???
???Wonder where it went to,??? he said, resting his eyes from reading. She sat down on the bed.
???I wanted it so much,??? she said. ???I don??™t know why I wanted it so much. I wanted that poor kitty. It isn??™t any fun to be a poor kitty out in the rain.???
George was reading again.
She went over and sat in front of the mirror of the dressing table looking at herself with the hand glass. She studied her profile, first one side and then the other. Then she studied the back of her head and her neck.
???Don??™t you think it would be a good idea if I let my hair grow out??? she asked, looking at her profile again.
George looked up and saw the back of her neck, clipped close like a boy??™s.
???I like it the way it is.???
???I get so tired of it,??? she said. ???I get so tired of looking like a boy.???
George shifted his position in the bed. He hadn??™t looked away from her since she started to speak.
???You look pretty darn nice,??? he said.
She laid the mirror down on the dresser and went over to the window and looked out. It was getting dark.
???I want to pull my hair back tight and smooth and make a big knot at the back that I can feel,??? she said. ???I want to have a kitty to sit on my lap and purr when I stroke her.???
???Yeah??? George said from the bed.
???And I want to eat at a table with my own silver and I want candles. And I want it to be spring and I want to brush my hair out in front of a mirror and I want a kitty and I want some new clothes.???
???Oh, shut up and get something to read,??? George said. He was reading again.
His wife was looking out of the window. It was quite dark now and still raining in the palm trees.
???Anyway, I want a cat,??? she said, ???I want a cat. I want a cat now. If I can??™t have long hair or any fun, I can have a cat.???
George was not listening. He was reading his book. His wife looked out of the window where the light had come on in the square.
Someone knocked at the door.
???Avanti,??? George said. He looked up from his book. In the doorway stood the maid. She held a big tortoise-shell cat pressed tight against her and swung down against her body.
???Excuse me,??? she said, ???the padrone asked me to bring this for the Signora.???

Helpful hints about the author
Ernest Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Illinois on the 21th of July 1899. He died in 1961, 62 years old. As a seventeen-year-old boy he started as a writer in a newspaper office, and that was the beginning of his great career. He had a predilection for understatement, which was, and is, not a very usually way to give a text the meaning it depends on. But all the way he managed this technique very well, and his texts actually grow bigger at it. Almost every novel of his have been film, and many of the themes in them are still important today. Now I will write a short analysis of one of his short stories, called “Cat in the rain”, and this one also has a theme, which draws its lines to the community of today.

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?????®?????¤? ?­?­?? ?…. ?•???¬???­???????? ?«?????????  ?????¤ ?„?®?????¬?» ?§? ?©?¬? ?? ???°?? ?­?????®???­???µ ?±???®?°???­???? ???????±????, ? ?«?? ???°?? ?¶???®?¬?? ???®?­?® ???®???­?®?? ?¬???°?®?? ?­? ?±???·???­?® ?§?¬???±???®???­?®. ?’???? ???®?¦?­?  ?¬?®???­?  ?®?¤???­???¶?? ???????±????, ?????«???·? ???·?? ?? ?±???¬? ?­?????·?­?? ?±?«?®??? , ?­?? ???°?®?±???® ?­???±?? “????? ?­?? ???­???®?°?¬? ?¶????”, ? ?«?? ?????«???·? ???????±?? ?? ?±???«? ?¤?­?? ?±???±?????¬?? ???®?­??? ?????­???µ ???  ?¤???±??? ?­???­???µ ?±???¬? ?­?????·?­???µ, ???¬?®?¶???©?­???µ, ?®?¶???­?­???µ ?§?????§??????, ?????? ?®?°??? ?­???§???????? ?®?±?­?®???­???© – ?????¤???????±???­???©, ???¬???«???¶?????­???© – ?±?¬???±?« ?®???®?????¤??. ?–?? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? – ?§?°? ?§?®?? ?¤?????®?????¦?­?® ?????«???­?®?? ???°?®?§?? ???? ?? ???®?°?¬? ?«???­?®?¬??, ??? ?? ?? ?? ?§?¬???±???®???­?®?¬?? ?????¤?­?®?????­?­??.
?‚ ?«???­???©?­?®?¬?? ?°?®?§???®?°??? ?­?­?? ???????±???? ?·????? ?· ?§?­? ?©?®?¬???????±?? ?§ ?¬?®?«?®?¤?®?? ??? ?°?®??, ???????© ?­???·???¬ ?§? ?©?­???????±?? ?? ?¤?®???®?????© ?¤???­?? ?­?  ?¬?®?¤?­?®?¬?? ?????°?®?°????. ?–??, ?? ?????°?¬???­?®?«?®?????? ??. ??. ??? ?«???????°???­? , ?§?¬???±???®???­?®-??? ??????? ?«???­?  ???­???®?°?¬? ?¶???? (?‡?”??) ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­??. ???¤?­? ?? ?­?? ???®?­?  ???®?°?¬???? ???®?­?¶?????? – ???¤????, ?®?±?­?®???­?? ?¤???¬???? ?????®?°??[1], ?????? ? ?????®?° ???°?®???®?¤?????? ?? ?±???®???¬?? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­??, ?µ?®?·?  ?±? ?¬?? ?‡?”?? ?¬? ?? ?±?????­? ?«??, ???® ?§?¤???©?±?­???????? ?????°???¤? ?·?? ???«???????­?­?®?? – ?§?¬???±???®???­?®-?????¤???????±???­?®??- ???­???®?°?¬? ?¶???? (?‡??).
?’???°?¬???­ “?????¤???????±??” ?§?????°???? ?±???®?? ???­?????°?????­?? ???®?°?¬?? ?? ? ?¤??????? ???­?® ?????¤?®???°? ?¦? ?? ??????????: ?????¤???????±?? – ?¶?? ???«???????­?  ???????±????. ?????¦??, ?¬?? ???®?????­?­?? ?§?­? ?©???? ?? ?¬?®???­???© ?¬? ?????°???? ?????®?°?? ???? ?±?????­? ?«??, ?????? ?­???±?????? ?¤?®?¤? ?????®???? ???­???®?°?¬? ?¶????, ???® ???®?°?¬???? ?????¤???????±??.
?—????? ???? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? ?±?«???¤ ???®?????«???­?®, ?§???????­?????·???±?? ?­?  ???®?¦?­?®?¬?? ??? ???®?¬?? ?±?????­? ?«??, ???®?? ?????­?¶?????? ?????±?­?®?????? ??? ?§????? ?«???±?? ?­?? ?±?????«?????? ?­?  ???­?????????????­?®-???¬?®?¶???©?­?®?¬?? ?????¤?­?®?????­?­?? ?¤?® ???®???®, ???® ?????¤??????? ???????±?? (???® ?????¦ ?¤???¦?? ??? ?¦?«?????®, ? ?«?? ?§? ?§?­? ?? ?°???§?????µ ???­?¤???????¤??? ?«???­???µ ?§?¬???????­??), ?±?????«?????? ?­?  ?®?????????????­???µ, ?????­???µ ?¤?«?? ???±???µ, ?¬? ?????°??? ?«???­???µ ?§?­? ??? ?µ.
?????®?????¤? ?­?­?? ?????¤???°????? ???????±?? ?°???·???­?­???¬ “There were only two Americans at the hotel”. ?‘?«?®???® “only” ?­?®?°?¬? ???????­?® ?????°???¤??? ?·? ?? ?­? ?????­???±???? ???®?????°???¤?­???®???® ?????±?«?®???«????? ?­?­??: “?‡? ?§?????·? ?©… ??? ??? ???® ? ?¬???°????? ?­?¶????, ?  ?§? ?°? ?§ – ?????«?????? ?¤???®??”. ???§?­? ?·???­???© ? ?°???????«??, ???® ?????®?¤?????? ?¬???±?¶?? ?¤????, ?????¤???°?????«???? ???¬???«????? ?¶???? ?????°???¤????? ?­?­??, ?????  ???????®?°???«? ?±??, – ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? ???®?·???­? ???????±?? ?§ ?±???°???¤???­??, ???® ?µ? ?°? ???????°?­?® ?¤?«?? ?•???¬???­???????? ?? ?¶???«?®?¬??, ???? ?? ?¤?«?? ??? ??? ?????®?µ ?©?®???® ?±???·? ?±?­???????? ???  ???®?±?«???¤?®???­????????.
???®?????¬ ?©?¤?? ?¤???¦?? ??? ?¦?«?????  ?¤?«?? ???®?¤? ?«?????®?? ?®???®?????¤?? ?§??? ?¤??? , ???® ???®?­?? ?????? ?­?????®???® ?­?? ?§?­? ?«??: “They did not know any of the people they passed…” ?–?? ???°? ?§?  ???®???±?­???? ?®?¤?­?? ?§ ???°???·???­ ?­? ?±???°?®?? ?????°?®????. ?????¦???¦, ???????® ?? ?? ?­???µ ?????«?? ?????? ?§?­? ?©?®?¬??, ???±?? ?¬?®???«?® ?? ???????? ???­? ??????.
?„? ?«?? ?©?¤?? ?­? ?¤???® ?¤????? ?«???­???©, ?­?  ?????°?????© ???®???«???¤, ?®?????± ?­?®?¬???°? . ???«?? ?© ?????­ ?¤???¦?? ??? ?¦?«???????©: “second floor facing the sea”, “faced the public garden” -???±?? ?¶?? ???®???®?°?????? ???°?® ????, ???® ?­?®?¬???° ?¤?®?°?®?????©, ???  ?© ???®?????«?? ?­?? ?§ ?¤???????????µ, ???????® ?????­ ?°?®?§??? ???®??? ?­???© ?? ??? ???®?¬?? ???¤? ?«?®?¬?? ?¬???±?¶?? ?? ???°???©?¬? ?? ??? ??? ???® ? ?¬???°????? ?­?¶????. ???????± ?????¤??, ???® ?????¤???°????? ???????±?? ?§ ???????®?­, ?????¤???????°?¤?¦???? ?????????­???????«???­???±???? ???®?????«??: ?±? ?¤ ?§ ?????±?®?????¬?? ??? ?«???¬? ?¬??, ?§?­? ?¬???­???????© ??? ?¬?????­???? (????? ?«???©?¶?? ???°?????¦?¤?¦? ?«?? ?§?¤? ?«??????, ???®?? ???®??? ?·?????? ?©?®???®), ?µ???¤?®?¦?­?????? ?????? ???????????? ?????©?§? ?¦??. ?’?°?®?µ?? ?­???¦?·?? ?§??? ?¤?????????±??, ???® ?????? ?§? ???¦?¤?? ??? ??? ???® ? ?????®?¬?®?????«????. ???????®?° ?±?????¶??? ?«???­?® ???¦????? ?? ?®?§?­? ?·???­???© ? ?°???????«??: “The motorcars…” – “????, ??????… “.
?‚ ?¶???®?¬?? ?¦ ? ???§? ?¶?? ?????®?¤???????±?? ?±?«?®???® “rain”, ?????? ???µ?®?¤?????? ?? ?§? ???®?«?®???®?? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­??. ???®?????®?° ?§? ???®?«?®???­???µ ?±?«???? ?§? ???¦?¤?? ?­???±?? ???µ ?±???¬? ?­?????·?­?? ???±???«? ?¤?­???­?­??. ?’???? ???®???? ?°???§?­?? ???®?°?¬?? ?±?«?®???  ?°??? ?«???§???????? ?©?®???® ?®?±?­?®???­?? ?­?®?¬???­? ???????­?? ?§?­? ?·???­?­?? – “?¤?®??”. ?‡?  ?°? ?µ???­?®?? ?????°?????«???·???­?­?? ???°? ?¬? ?????·?­?®???® ?·? ?±?? – ???®?????® ?§?  ?°? ?µ???­?®?? ?§?¬???­?? ???°? ?¬? ?????·?­?®???® ?§?­? ?·???­?­??, ?­?? ???®?°?????????·?? ???®?????®?°, ? ?????®?° ?????¤ ?§? ??? ?«???­?®???® ?®?????±?? ?????°???µ?®?¤?????? ?¤?® ?¶???®???®?µ?????«???­?­?®???® ?±???¦?????­?®???® ?????????°?????­???®???®: ?????¤ Past Indefinite “… glistend in the rain” ?¤?® Past Continuous – “It was raining”.
???°?® ?¬?®?­?®???®?­?­???±???? ???®???®, ???® ?????¤??????? ???????±??, ???°?® ????, ???® ?¤?®?? ???¤?? ?¤?®?????®, ?±??? ?? ?????¤?®?¬?® ?§ ?­?????°???¬???µ ?¤????? ?«???©: ?­?  ???«?®???? ?­?? ?§? ?«???????«?®?±?? ?¦?®?¤?­?®???® ? ?????®?¬?®?????«??; ?µ?®?·?  ?±?????¦???? ???®?±????? ?­?? ???°? ???????¬ ??, ?®???¦??, ?¤?®???°?? ???????°? ?????? ???®?¤??, ?­?  ?­???µ ?±???®?????? ??? ?«???¦??; ?????°?®???®?«???±???? ??? ?«???¬?? ???¦?? ?­?? ?§? ?µ????? ?????? ?????¤ ?¤?®????: “The rain dripped from the palm-trees”. ?„?????±?«?®???® “dripped” ?????°???¤? ?? ?? ?µ? ?°? ?? ?????° ?¤?®???? (?¤? ?«?? ?????¤?? ???®?°???­???????© ???®?????®?° “dripping green tables”): ?¶?? ?­?? ?«?????­?? ???°?®?§? , ?  ?­? ?¤?®?????·?«???????© ?®?±???­?­???© ?±?????·???© ?¤?®??. ?? ???®???¤?­? ?­?­?? “?¤?®????” ?§ “?¬?®?°???¬” ?? ?®?¤?­?®?¬?? ?°?????¬???§?®??? ?­?®?¬?? ?°???·???­?­??, ???°?? ?±???­??? ???±???·?­?®?¬?? ??? ?°? ?«???«???§?¬?? ???  ?«?????±???·?­?®?¬?? ???®?????®?°?? ?© ? ?«???????°? ?¶????-???±?? ?¶?? ?????¤???°???±?«????, ?????°?????«???? ?????¤?·???????? ?­???¤?­?®???® ?¤?­?? ?? ?????«???·? ???????±?? ?? ?±???±?????¬?? ???°???·???­?­?®-?­? ?±?«???¤???®?????µ ?????¤?­?®?????­??, ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­??. ?„???©?±?­?®, ?§?­? ?©?®?¬???µ ?­???¬? ??, ???®?????«?????? ?­?? ?¬?®?¦?­? , ?§? ?«????? ???????±?? ?±???¤?????? ?? ?? ?­?®?¬???°??, ?§? ?¤?®???®?«???­?????·???±?? ?±?????«??????? ?­?­???¬ ?®?¤???­ ?§ ?®?¤?­???¬.

?‘?????«??????? ?­?­?? ?¦ ?­?®?±?????? ?­? ?¤?§?????·? ?©?­?® ?®???¬???¦???­???© ?µ? ?°? ???????°. ?‡ ?????°???®?? ???°? ?§?? ?¤?°?????®???® ? ???§? ?¶?? ?¬?? ???§?­? ???¬?®, ???® ?¶?? ?¤???®?? ? ?¬???°????? ?­?¶???? – ???®?¤?°???¦?¦?? ?–?? ???­???®?°?¬? ?¶???? ?????®?¤???????±?? ?­?? ?±?????¶??? ?«???­?®, ?  ?¬???¬?®?µ???¤??: “The American wif?? stood… looking out”. ??? ?????­???±???? ?¤?????±?«?®???  ?±???°???©?­???????? ?¤?®?§???®?«???? ?????¤?­???±???? ?®?????±??, ?????? ?©?®???® ?®???°? ?¬?«????????, ?¤?® ??? ?? ?§??? ?­???µ ? ?????®?°???§?®??? ?­???µ ?????±?«?®???«?? ??? ?­??. ???????± ???«?®???? ?­?  ???®?·? ?????? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? ?? ?¤? ?«?? – ?±???®?«??, ?§ ?????®???® ???°? ??? ?? ???®?¤? , ? ?????®?°???§?®??? ?­??: ???®?­?? ?¬? ?????? ? ?????®?°? , ???®?­???°?????­?? ?®?±?®????, ???® ?±???°???©?¬? ?? ??? ?°?????­??, ?  ?±?«?®???® “outside”, ?????? ???®?·???­? ?? ?¤?°?????? ?°???·???­?­?? ?¤?°?????®???® ? ???§? ?¶??, ?????¤???°???±?«???? ?­? ?????­???±???? ?±???®?±?????°????? ???·?®?? ?®?±?®????, ???¬???«???¶?????­?® ???°???????±??? ???·?? ? ?­?????????§?? “inside”[2].
?‚ ?¶???®?¬?? ?¦ ?°???·???­?­?? ?????®?¤???????±?? ?¤?°?????? ?§? ???®?«?®???­?? ?±?«?®???® – “cat”. ?‚?®?­?® ?????¤?? ???®?????®?°???­?® ???°?®???????®?¬ ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? 13 ?°? ?§????. ?‘?«???¤ ??? ???®?¦ ???°? ?µ????? ????, ???® ?¬?®?«?®?¤?  ? ?¬???°????? ?­???  ???????®?°???±???®?????? ?¶?? ?±?«?®???® ?? ?¬?®???«???­?­??, ?????«?????? ???®?«?? ?±?????«???????????±?? ????? ?«???©?±?????®?? ?? ?? ?±? ?¬???© ?®?±??? ?­?­???© ?±???®???© ?°?????«???¶??. ?“ ???±???µ ???­?????µ ??????? ?¤??? ?µ ???®?­?  ?­? ?§????? ?? ?????????? ?????¶?????®?? – ?±???®?·? ?????? ?¶?? ???°?®?±???® “kitty”, ???®?????¬ ???? ???°???·?? “poor kitty”, ?? ?§?­?®???? “kitty” – ???±???®???® 7 ?°? ?§????. ?????¦??, ???°?®???????®?¬ ?¬? ?«???­?????®???® ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­??, ???® ?­? ?°? ?µ?®?????? ???±???®???® 1142 ?±?«?®???®???¦????? ?­?­??, ?§ ???????µ 495 -? ?????®?±???¬? ?­?????·?­?? ?±?«?®??? , 20 ?®?¤???­???¶??, ? ???® 4%, ?????¤?¤? ?­?? ?«?????±???¬?? “????????? “.
???®?????®?°?? ?•???¬???­???????? ?§?­? ?¬???­??????. ???°?® ?­???µ ?­???®?¤?­?®?°? ?§?®???® ?????±? ?«?? ?? ?? ?­? ?±, ?? ?§?  ???®?°?¤?®?­?®?¬. ??? ???????? ?? ?¬? ?«???­???????© “???????¶?? ?????¤ ?¤?®?????¬” ???µ ?????«????? . ?–?? “cat”, “rain”, “I want”, ?????? ???®?????®?°?????????±?? 11 ?°? ?§???? ?? ?????­?¶?? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? ?? ?¬???¦? ?µ ?®?¤?­?????? ???°???????®?? ?±???®?°???­????, ?? ?¤?????±?«?®???® “to read” (Fa = 6), ?? ?®???®?????§???®???  ? ?????®?°?±?????  ?°???¬? ?°???  “he (she) said”, ?????®?? ?????®?¤???????±?? ?­? ???????? ?®?±??? ?­?­?? ?????¤?·? ?©?¤?????­?  ?°?????«?????  ?????°?®???­??.
??? ???????® ???®???°?????­?? ?¶?? ???®?????®?°?? ???®?¦?«?????®, ???®?­?? ???????®?°???±???®???????????±?? ? ?????®?°?®?¬ ???®?¬??, ???® “?????­ ?­?? ?§?­? ?? ???­?????µ ?±?«????”, ???? ?±??? ?§? ?? ?®?¤???­ ?°?®?§?¤?°? ???®??? ?­???© ???°???????? ?‡?????·? ?©?­?®, ?­??. ???®?????®?°?? ?­???±?????? ?¤?®?¤? ?????®???? ???­???®?°?¬? ?¶????, ???®?¬?? ???® ???®?¦?­?? ?­? ?±???????­?? ???¦????? ?­?­?? ?±?«?®???  ?±?????¤?®?¬?® ? ???® ?­???±?????¤?®?¬?® ???°?????¤?­?????????±?? ?·????? ?·???¬ ?¤?® ???®?????°???¤?­???®???®. ?‘???¬? ?­?????·?­???© ?®?????¬ ?±?«?®???  ?§?°?®?±??? ??, ???®?­?® ?­? ??????? ?? ?­?®?????µ ?§?­? ?·???­??, ?????? ?? ?¬?®???? – ?? ?±?«?®???­?????? – ?­?? ???±?­????????. ?–???© ?¦ ?¬?????? ?±?«???¦? ???? ?? ???®?????®?°?? ?? ?¤? ?­?®?¬?? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­??. “?????????  ?????¤ ?¤?®?????¬” – ?¶?? ?­?? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? ???°?® ?«?????®?? ?¤?® ????? ?°???­. ?‡?  ?­???§?­? ?·?­?®?? ?±??????? ?¶?????? ???°???µ?®??? ?­?? ?§?­? ?·?­?? ???§? ??? ?«???­???­?­??. ?—?? ??? ?? ?¶?? ?—?? ???°? ?????«???­?®, ???®?????® ?·?? ?§?????¤?­?® ?§ ? ?????®?°?±???????¬ ?§? ?¤???¬?®?¬, ?¬?? ?°?®?§???°????? ???¬?® ???±?????­?­???©, ???®?­?¶????????? ?«???­???©, ?±?¬???±?« ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? ?—?? ?±???°? ?????¤?«?????  ?????°?®???® ???®?????°???­?  ?¤???¬???  ???°?® ????, ???® “?????????  ?????¤ ?¤?®?????¬” – ?¶?? ?±???¬???®?« ?±? ?¬?®???­???®??, ???®?­???®?? ?­? ?????°??, ?­???§?°?®?§???¬???«?®?? ???  ?±???°? ?¦?¤? ???·?®?? ???°???¤?±??? ???­???¶?? ?????°? ?·???­?®???® ???®???®?«???­?­?? ?‚???¤???®?????¤?? ?­?  ??????? ?­?­??, ???® ?­? ?± ?¶????? ???«??????, ?±?«???¤ ??????? ???? ?? ???????±????.
???®-?????°????, ?±?«???¤ ?°?®?§?????°? ?????±??, ?¤?«?? ?·?®???® ??? ??? ???  ? ?¬???°????? ?­?±?????  ??? ?°?  ?????°????????? ?? ?­?  ?????????­???????«???­?®?¬?? ?????°?®?°????. ?’???°???±???? ????, ?????°???±?????·?­???© ?±???§?®?­ ?§? ?????­?·???­?®. ?‘???°? ???? ?‘???¤???·?? ?§ ?¬???±?¶?? ?¤???? ???  ???®?????¤???­???? ?·?®?«?®??????? , ??? ???®?¦ ?­??. ???¬???°????? ?­?±?????? ?????±??? ???°??? ?­???? ???????? ?????µ, ?????? ?????§?­?????? ?§?????«???????±?? ?? ?°?®?¬? ?­?? ?…. ?•???¬???­???????? “?”?????±??? ” ?’? ???®?¦ ?­??. ?’?? ?????«???«???±?? ?®?¤???­ ?¤?® ?®?¤?­?®???® ?? ?­?? ?????¤?¤? ?«???«???±?? ?????¤ ?§?????·?­???µ ??? ???? ???  ??? ?°???? ?????«???????µ ?¬???±??. ?‚?°? ?µ?®???????·?? ?????? ?????°?®????, ?????°? ?¤?? ?¬?®?«?®?¤?®?? ?¦???­???? ?????°???¤ ?¤?§???°??? ?«?®?¬, ???? ?????§?????°???·?­?? ?????§???·?­?? ???°????? ???«???????±???? ?¤?«?? ?·?®?«?®???????  (“???? hadnt looked away from her…”; “You look pretty darn nice”, he said…”), ?¬?®?¦?­?  ?§?°?®???????? ?????±?­?®???®??, ???® ?¶?? ?¬?®?«?®?¤????? , ?????? ?????°????????? ?????? ?? ?????±???«???­???© ???®?¤?®?°?®?¦??.
???? ?¦?? ???®???®?¤?????? ?±?????? ?¬?®?«?®?¤???© ?·?®?«?®?????? ???®?±?????©?­???© ???®?????®?° ?±?«?®???  “read (ing)” ?? ?????¬? ?????·?­?®???® ???®?????§? ?­?®???® ?§ ?­???¬ ?±?«?®???  “book”, ???§???????© ???®?§?  ?¬? ???°?®-???®?­???????±???®?¬, ?¬?®?¦?? ?­? ?????±???? ?­?  ?¤???¬????, ???® ?„?¦?®?°?¤?¦ – ???­?????«????????? ?«, ???????© ?­?? ?¬?®?¦?? ?????¤???°??? ?????±?? ?????¤ ???­??????. ???¤?­? ?? – ?? ?????? ?·????? ?· ???? ?°? ?§ ?????°?????®?­?????????±??, ???® ???®?¦?­?? ?????????? ?? ?µ???¤?®?¦?­???®?¬?? ???????±???? ?±?«???¤ ?°?®?§???«???¤? ???? ?­?? ???§?®?«???®??? ?­?®, ?  ?? ???????±???®?????© ?±???±?????¬??, – ???¬?®???? ???®?????®?°?? ?§?¬???????????? ?©?®???® ???°???©???? ?¤?® ?¤??? ?¬?????°? ?«???­?® ???°?®?????«???¦?­?®?? ?¤???¬????. ???­?????  ?? ?°????? ?µ ?„?¦?®?°?¤?¦?  ?±??? ?? ???®??? ?§?­?????®?¬ ?©?®???® ?­???????µ?®??? ?­?®?±????, ?­???§?????®?? ?????«???????°??. ?‚???­ ?­?? ?±?«???µ? ?? ?¤?°???¦???­??, ???®?«?? ???®?­?  ?????¬?®???«???? ?±?????© ?¬?®?­?®?«?®??, ?­?? ???­????? ?? ?? ?§?¬???±?? ???? ?®???°???¬???µ ?°?????«???? ?? ???°?®???®?­???? ?±???®?? ???®?±?«?????? ???°???­???±???? ?????????? ?«?????? ???®?°?¬? ?«???­?®, ?­?? ?§?¬???­?????·?? ???®?«?®?¦???­?­?? ?? ?«???¦????: “Ill do it”, her husband offered from the bed”, ?? ?¤? ?«??, ?? ?????¤???®?????¤?? ?­?  ???? ?°?????«?????? “(he)… went on reading”. ?‚?°? ?µ?®???????·?? ?¤?????±?«?????­?? ?·? ?±?? ?? ?«?????±???·?­?? ?§?­? ?·???­?­?? ?¤?????±?«????, ?·????? ?· ?°?®?§???¬????, ???® ?????­ ?§? ???°?®???®?­????? ?? ?¤?®???®?¬?®???? ?¤?°???¦???­??, ?­?? ?????¤?°????? ???·???±?? ?????¤ ?·????? ?­?­??, ?? ?·????? ???·?? ???°?®?¤?®???¦????? ?? ?°?®?§?¬?®???«??????. ???? ??????? ?¤???®???® ?¤?????±?«?®???® “to read” ???¦????? ???????±?? ?????°????? ?¦?­?® ?? Past Continuous tense – ?·????? ?­?­?? ?±?«???¦?????? ???®?±?????©?­???¬ ???®?­?®?¬: “The husband went on reading”, “George was on the bed reading”, “George was reading again”, “George was not listening” (?????±?? ?·? ?± ???? ?¬?®?­?®?«?®????), “???? was reading his book”. ??? ???????? ???®?«?? ?¤?°???¦???­?  ???µ?®?¤?????? ?¤?® ?????¬?­? ???? ?? ?????­ ?­? ?°???????? ?????¤???©?¬? ?? ?®?·?? ?????¤ ???­?????? ?¶?? ?­?? ???°?®???? ?¤?® ?­???? ?¶????? ???®?±???? ?? ????? ???? – ?????­ ?????¤???®?·????? ?? ?????¤ ?·????? ?­?­??: “.. ?‹???± said, resting his eyes from reading”. ?‰?®???® ?¬?®???«???­?­?????  ??? ?°?????? ?±???«? ?¤? ???????±?? ?«?????? ?§ 8 ?¬? ?«???­???????µ ?°?????«???? ?§ 3-5 ?±?«????. ??? ?©???®?°?®?????  – “Yeah” – ?????¤?????°?????© ???°?®???? ?­??????? ???? ?¤?® ?¬?®???«???­?­?? ?¦???­????, ?­? ?©?¤?®?????  – 8 ?±?«???? – ???®?·???­? ???????±?? ?§ ?®???°? ?§?«?????®???® “Shut up”.
?????±?????¶?????? ?±?????«??????? ?­?­?? ?????­ ?¤???©?±?­?® ?­?? ?­? ???·???­???©. ?????¤???·?? ???¤???®?µ ?§ ?¬?®?«?® ?¤?®?? ?¤?°???¦???­?®??, ???? ???°????? ???«???????±???? ?®?¶???­?????? ?????­ ?¬?®?¦??, ?  ???®???®?°?????? ?­???¬?  ???°?® ???®.
???? ?  ???®?­?  ???? ?¬?®???«???­?­?????  ??? ?°?????? ?­? ??? ??? ???® ?°?®?§???®?°?­????????? . ?™?® ?¦ ?¤?®?¬?? ?­???? ?? ???? ?¬?®???«???­?­?? ???®-?????°????, ?§?????°??? ?? ?­?  ?±?????? ????? ???? ?¤???¦?? ?µ? ?°? ???????°?­?? ?¬????? ?­?±?????®-?¬? ?­???°?­?? ?±?«?®???® “?????¶??”. ???? “????????? “, ?­?? “???®?????­??”, ?  “?????¶??”. ?„? ?«??, ???®?????®?° “I want” ?§ ?¤?®?±?????? ?­???®?·????????? ?­???¬ ?­? ???®?°?®?¬ ??? ?¦? ?­?®???®: ?? ?­? ?± ?­?  ?®?·? ?µ ?°?®?§???®?°??? ???????±?? ? ?±?®?¶??? ???????­???© ?°???¤, ?????¤??????? ???????±?? ?®?¤?­?®?·? ?±?­???© ???°?®?¶???± ?¤???¬ ???? – ?¬?®???«???­?­??, ?????±?«?®???«?????????±?? ?????®?«?®?± ?­?? ????, ???® ?°? ?­?????? ?¤???¬? ?«?®?±??, ?  ?±???®?? ?? ??? ?­?­??, ????, ???® ???°???©???«?® ?? ???®?«?®???? ?§?  ? ?±?®?¶??? ?¶??????. ?‚????? ?¤???®?????±???? ???  ?­???°?????­?® ?? ?­? ?·?­???±???? ?§??? ?¤????? ?­???µ ???®?°???¤ ?®???????????? ?§?¬???????? ?±???°???©?¬? ???? ???µ ?­?? ???? ?±???°?©?®?§?­??, ?????­?®?????­?? ???°???????­?§???? ???  ?????°???¦????? ?­?­??, ?  ???? ???°???¬?µ??, ?®?????¬?®???«???­?? ?? ?????¬, ???® ???? ???°???¬?µ??, ?¬? ????????, ?°? ?­?????? ???±???¬?  ???????®?­????? ?«???±?? (?¬?®?«?®?¤? , ??? ?°?­? , ??? ??? ??? ), ?? ?????¬, ???® ?§? ?°? ?§ ???®?±???­?®, ?­???¤?­?®, ???®?????±???«???????±?? ?­???¬?  ?§ ?????¬, ?°?®???????? ?­???·?®?? > ?‘?????«??????? ?­?­?? ?§ ?·?®?«?®???????®?¬ ?­?? ?????µ?®?¤?????? ?­?? ?????«?????? ?·???°???§ ????, ???® ?????­ ?±? ?¬
?¶???®???® ?­?? ???¬???? ?? ?????¤ ?????¤?±?????­?®?±???? ?¶???®???® ?­?? ?±???°? ?¦?¤? ??, ? ?«?? ?© ???®?¬??, ???® ???? ?¬?®???«???­?­?? – ?¶?? ?­?? ?±?????«??????? ?­?­?? ?? ???®???­?®?¬?? ?°?®?§???¬???­?­?? ?±?«?®???  (?®???¬???­ ?¤???¬??? ?¬??, ???¬?®?¶?????¬??, ?±???¤?¦???­?­???¬??), ?  ?«?????? ?°? ?¬???®?????© ?°?®?§???????®?? ?®?¤?­?®???® ?­? ???®?«?????«?????®???® ?¬?®???????? “?µ?®?·??”. ???®?«?®?¤???© ?????°?®???­?? ?¬?®?¦?­?  ???®?±???????·????? ????, ? ?«?? ?­? ???°???¤ ?·?? ?¬?®?¦?­?  ?????§?­? ?·?????? ???? ???? ?­? ?????°?? ??????????? ?­?? ???  ?­???§?°?®?§???¬???«??. ?–?? ??? ??? ???  ??? ?°?  ?®?¤?­? ???®???®?? ?¬???°?®?? ?????®???  ?¤???µ?®???­?®, ?? ?????¬???????­?? ?¤?®?????? ?????°????????? ?­?­?? ?­? ?®?¤???­?¶?? ?®?¤???­ ?§ ?®?¤?­???¬ ?°?®?§?????­?·???? ?®???®?µ.
?‚ ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? ?°?®?§?±????? ?­?? ?­?????°???¬?? ?¤????? ?«??, ???® ?????¤???°???±?«???????? ???°???·???­?? ???µ ??????? ?¤???®???®?? ???§?®?«???¶????: ???­?????µ ? ?¬???°????? ?­?¶???? ?­?? ?????«?®, ?§ ???­?????¬?? ???®?±???®???«???¶???¬?? ???®?????«?? ???®?­?? ?­?? ?§?­? ?©?®?¬?? (?§?????°?­?????? ????? ???? ?­?  ?­???§?­? ?·?­?? ?¬???°?? ???®?«?®?¤???­?­?? ?????°?®???¬?? ????? ?«???©?±?????®?? ?¬?®???®??, ???® ??? ???®?¦ ?®???¬???¦???? ???®?­??? ??????, ?? ?­?  ????, ???? ? ?????®?° ?????°???¤? ?? ???­?®?§???¬?­?? ?¬?®???? ?¤??? ?«?®????), ??? ???? ?????±???? (?®?????¶??? ?­?? ?±???®?????? ?? ?¤?????°???µ ?? ?¤???????????±?? ?­?  ?????«???¶??) – ?©???? ?¤?® ?­???®???® ?­???¬? ?? ?±???­?±??, ???®???®?¤?? ??? ???®?¦ ?­???¬? ??.
?? ?? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­?? ???? ?®?¤???­ ?????°?±?®?­? ?¦, ?¤???¦?? ??? ?¦?«???????© ?¤?«?? ?°?®?§?????????? ?®?±?­?®???­?®?? ?¤???¬???? ?????®?°?? – ???®?±???®?¤? ?° ???®?????«??. ?‰?®???® ???®?????¤???­???  – ???®???­?  ???°?®?????«???¦?­???±???? ?„?¦?®?°?¤?¦??. ?‚???­ ???®???«? ?¦?«???????© ?¤?® ??? ???°???§?? ? ?¬???°????? ?­????, ???®?¬?? ???® ?°?®?§???¬???? ?©?®???® ???????®????. ???? ??????? ?¤???®???® ?? ???°???±?????­?®?±???? ?¶???®???® ?±??? ?°?®???® ?¬?®?«?®?¤?  ?¦???­???  ?????¤?·????? ?? ?®?¤?­?®?·? ?±?­?® ?? ?±???®?? ?¦???­?®?·?? ?±???«??, ?? ?±???®?? ?¦???­?®?·?? ?±?«? ???????±???? ??“ ???? ?°?®?§???¬???­?­??, ?????®???® ???®?­?  ?????§???±???????­?® ?·????? ?? ?????¤ ?·?®?«?®??????? .
?????¦??, ?°?®?§???«???­???????? ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­??, ?????§???¬?®???­?®, ?±?«???¤ ???®???®?°?????? ???°?® ?±???¬? ?­?????·?­?? ?°?®?§?????°???­?­?? ?§? ???®?«?®???­???µ ?±?«????, ???°?® ?­? ?????????? ?­???¬?? ?­?®???®???® – ???????±???®???®???® – ?§?­? ?·???­?­?? “?­???§? ???????­?®, ?­?????°?????¬?­?®, ?­???¤?®???°??”. ???°?? ?¶???®?¬?? “?????????  ?????¤ ?¤?®?????¬” ?§?????°????? ?? ?? ?±???®?? ???®?·? ?????®???? ???°???¬?? ?§?­? ?·???­?­??, ?? ?????°? ?¦? ?? ???®?© ???°???????¤, ???????© ???®?±?«???¦???? ?????¤???°? ???­???¬ ?????­?????®?¬ ?¤?«?? ???®?°?¬????? ?­?­?? ?§?¬???±???®???­?®-???®?­?¶????????? ?«???­?®?? ???­???®?°?¬? ?¶???? ?????®?°?? (?‡????) – ???¤???? ???°?® ?¤???µ?®???­?? ???«???µ?®???? ?§?®???­?? ???«? ???®???®?«???·?­???µ, ?±?®?¶??? ?«???­?® ???  ?????­? ?­?±?®???® ???°?®?¶??????? ???·???µ ?¬?®?«?®?¤???µ ? ?¬???°????? ?­?¶???? 20-?µ ?°?®??????.
?‘?????¶??? ?«???­???µ ?¬?®???­???µ ?§? ?±?®??????, ???® ?????±???«???¶?????­?® ?????°? ?¦? ?????? ? ?????®?°?±?????? ???¤????, ?? ???????±???? ?­???¬? ??. ?‡???? ?­? ???®?????·?????????±?? ???®?±???????®???® – ?·???°???§ ? ???¶???­???? (?????°? ?¦???­?? ???®?????®?°? ?¬??) ?­?  ???????­?? ?°???±?? ???®?????¤???­???? ?? ?¬?®???«???­?­?? ?????°?±?®?­? ?¦????, ?·???°???§ ?§??- ???  ???°?®?????±??? ???«???­?­?? ???µ ?µ? ?°? ???????°???±??????, ?·???°???§ ?????°?®???® ???  ?°???§?­?®?¬? ?­?????­?® ???????®?°???±??? ?­?? ?µ???¤?®?¦?­?? ?¤????? ?«??.
???®?¦?­?  ?±??? ?§? ????, ???® ???°?®?§?  ?•???¬???­???????? ?¤?®???°?? ?±??? ???­?  – ??? ?? ?????±?­?® ???®?????§? ?­?? ?? ?­???© ?±???±???¤?­?? ?°???·???­?­??. ???®?§???«???­?????? ?????°?????© ? ???§? ?¶ ?®???®?????¤? ?­?­??, ?? ???? ???®??? ?·??????, ???? ?°?®?§???®?°??? ???????±?? ?«? ?­?¶???¦?®?? ???®?????®?°????, ???® ?§? ?????§?????·???? ?¦?®?°?±?????? ???????±???®???? ???®?????§????.
?‘?«???¤ ??? ???®?¦ ?§?????°?­?????? ????? ???? ?­?  ????, ???? ?????®?¤???????±?? ???­?????°?????­?? ?¬?®???«???­?­?? ?????°?®???­??: ?????¤?·???­???????? ?¤?????°??, ???®?­?  ?????§???°?­???«?  ?­?  ?????«???¶?? – “looked out”. ?„? ?«?? ? ?????®?°???§?®??? ?­???© ?®?????± ???®???®, ???® ???®?­?  ???®??? ?·???«? : “…raining… a man… crossing”. ?? ?? ?­? ?±???????­?®?¬?? ?°???·???­?­?? – ?­???±???®?¤????? ?­?  ?§?¬???­?  ???°? ?¬? ?????·?­?®???® ?·? ?±?? ???  ???®?????  Future in the Past: “The cat would be around… she could go along…”
?­???¬?®?? ???? ?¤?????±?«?????­?? ?·? ?±?? ?§?¬???­???«???±?? ???®?¬??, ???® ?? ???????¤?­?  ???°? ?§?  “She thought the cat would be… and she could go…”. ?‚?§? ??? ?«?? ???®?????  Future in the Past ?? ? ?????®?°?±?????®?¬?? ???????±???? ?????§ ?«? ???®?? – ?±?????­? ?« ???????¤???­?­?? ???®?«?®?±?? ?????°?±?®?­? ?¦? , ?????°???¤? ?·?? ???????«? ?¤?? ?¶???®?¬?? ?????°?±?®?­? ?¦??, ?±?????¤?·???­?­?? ?????°???µ?®?¤?? ?¤?® ???­?????°?????­???®???® ? ???® ?­?????«? ?±?­??-???°???¬?®???® ?¬?®???«???­?­??.

What is a theme in Cat in the Rain
There are several: * loneliness * isolation * infertility * longing to be something/ someone else * wishing
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|Risking nothing: American romantics in “Cat in the Rain.” |
|Clarence Lindsay // Hemingway Review, The. FindArticles.com. 15 Jul, 2009. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_6754/is_n1_v17/ai_n28700458/ |
|”Cat in the Rain” is Ernest Hemingways subtle exploration of this American romantic quest for identity. |
|The opening sentence suggests immediately that this is going to be an especially American story. “There were only two Americans stopping at the hotel” (CSS |
|129). The fact that they are the only Americans in the hotel hints at the peculiar cultural tensions that will be one of the storys principal dynamics. The |
|”only” linguistically isolates them from whoever else is staying there and at the same time defines their common cultural identity. The idiomatic “stopping at |
|the hotel” is suggestive in a way that “staying at” would not be. The “stopping at” implies both a past and future of movement, a nomadic tourism. Also, the |
|conspicuously British idiom may be a very slight indication of the couples cultural acquisitiveness, as if the narrators language is affected by proximity to |
|them. These admittedly slight suggestions are, of course, strengthened later in the story |
|The second sentence tells us that the couple is isolated personally as well as culturally. “They did not know any of the people they passed on the stairs on the|
|way to and from their room” (129). Their isolation is deepened by the wearying and even tedious sameness of their passing others while going “to and from their |
|room.” By not describing what the couple has seen or done, Hemingway focuses on repetitive proximities that are without intimacy. |
|In the description of their rooms location and view that follows, Hemingway establishes the thematic significance of the rain and, with extreme delicacy, |
|claims a moral superiority for his own artistic perspective. Their room faces the sea, the public garden, and the war monument. The public garden, with “the way|
|the palms grew” and the contrasting “bright colors of the hotels facing the gardens and the sea” (129), appeals to artists when there is good weather. But |
|apparently there is no appeal to these artists in bad weather, either because of the inconvenience or difficulty in painting when it is raining or because the |
|appealingly bright colors are muted. Now the square is empty and the Italians who would come “from a long way off to look up at the war monument” do not come to|
|revere (“look up” gives the feeling of reverence) the monument in the rain (129). “The motor cars were gone from the square by the war monument” (129). The rain|
|is given such emphasis that we feel its thematic insistence. We are told the war monument “glistened in the rain.” Then we are told, “It was raining. The rain |
|dripped from the palm trees. Water stood in pools on the gravel paths.” Then the narrator looks away from the scene immediately below the window toward the sea:|
|”The sea broke in a long line in the rain and slipped back down the beach to come up and break again in a long line in the rain” (129). |
|Hemingways narrator, then, attends to images and conditions that are not seen or experienced by other audiences, either the patriotic Italians or the artists. |
|The rain opposes their fair-weather desires, implying all that is contrary to those superficial tastes.(1) We dont need to import the thematic significance of |
|rain from other fictions like A Farewell to Arms. Its already here. Later, we will discover there is a moral dimension to going out in the rain. This opening |
|description, which examines what other audiences are too timid to do, is the equivalent of an aesthetic manifesto and an implicit promise to go out in the rain.|
| |
|The next paragraph opens with “The American wife stood at the window looking out” (129). Hemingway takes special care in naming or referring to characters. The |
|woman in this story is not given a Christian name, but different references to her constitute significantly different identities. Here, the narrators first |
|appellation underlines her cultural and marital status, the context through which we will see the opening signs of her dissatisfaction. Her looking away from |
|her husband toward an outer landscape can be taken as another sign of their crisis, although we will have to depend on what follows and other instances of such |
|looking outward to give that force here. |
|The description of the cat” crouched under one of the dripping green tables” attempting “to make herself so compact that she would not be dripped on” is |
|significant for purposes of comparison later (129). All we know about the cat from this description is that it does not want to be dripped on and that it is |
|female. The wife announces her intention to “get that kitty” (129). Her conversion of the cat to “kitty” and all the diminutive, caressing tenderness implicit |
|in that designation is an interpretive act on her part, standing for a set of emotions that will become clear later. |
|The husbands first utterance deftly captures his enervated romantic identity. “`Ill do it, her husband offered from the bed” (129). The statement calls up |
|the chivalric system in which the man undertakes a physically onerous task, relieving the woman from such duty. But it is clear immediately and from what |
|follows that the husband has no actual desire to serve. It is an offer rather than a statement of intent. By giving her a choice, he signals his opposite |
|desire, saying in effect that he will do it only if she asks him to. The system of mens eager servitude to women is here invoked as a feeble fiction of |
|selfhood, the husband acknowledging a duty that he would rather not undertake. He knows what he should be, should do, but doesnt want to be, to do. He |
|substitutes language for action. The chivalric ideal he has dressed himself in is further parodied by making his “offer” from the bed from which he never rises.|
|This listless, inert parody of the chivalric male serves at first as a contrast to his wifes apparent forceful readiness to undertake the cats salvation. |
|Perhaps she doesnt accept her husbands offer because she has already lost faith in him, but her response gives no hint yet of any dissatisfaction toward him, |
|although signs of it will appear soon. She eagerly wants the task for herself, apparently motivated by compassion: “No, Ill get it. The poor kitty out trying |
|to keep dry under a table” (129). The husband, either too tired to continue his chivalric role or fearing that any further offer might be accepted, continues |
|his “reading, lying propped up with two pillows at the foot of the bed” (129). Reading, lying propped up, the American romantic imposter. The husbands next |
|words to his wife as she leaves to get the cat are “Dont get wet” (129). His chivalric “protectiveness” is a comic sham, reduced to an effortless, laconic |
|admonition. |
|Leaving the chivalric imposter behind, the American wife goes downstairs, seemingly eager to take over the role of vigorous rescuer. We see the first signs of a|
|love triangle of sorts, a triangle that has cultural implications. The hotel owner stands up and bows to her as she passes his office. The very fact that he |
|stands up significantly separates him from the supine, inert husband back in the room. His standing up to bow is an oxymoron of sorts, combining a physical |
|assertion with an act of deference, each capacity meaningless without the other, providing another contrast to the shallow and lifeless imitation of service |
|offered by the husband. This scene is a good example of Hemingways painterly expressionism: essential character contrasts expressed in a geometry of opposed |
|forms–the vertical movement of the European innkeeper against the horizontal inertness of the American husband. |
|When the wife addresses the innkeeper, she speaks in Italian, “Il piove” (129). |
|Hemingway sometimes uses the bilingual capacity as a way of measuring the relationship to and desire for a whole range of exotic or foreign values. The |
|womens inability to speak the language of the country measures their dependence on and isolation from their male companions. As we will see here, the American |
|wifes bilingual foray is an integral part of a larger drama of desire and selfhood. Her decision to say in Italian that it is raining is linked immediately to |
|”She liked the hotel keeper” (129). |
|Interestingly, the narrator, unlike the American wife, does not call this man a “hotel-keeper.” He simply refers to him as the “hotel owner” (129). While the |
|two expressions are denotatively the same, “keeper” has a kind of romantic appeal, emphasizing a slightly elevated guardianship of something valuable (“keeper |
|of the flame”). “Keeper” implies not mere servitude, but the service of something important. “Keeper” is a statement of an identity. The term “hotel owner” is |
|not only a more neutral, objective term, but carries with it economic and social implications. Owners own and they are bosses as well. |
|The hotel owner responds to the woman using first Italian “Si, si, Signora, bruto tempo,” and follows immediately with a partial English translation, “Its very|
|bad weather” (130). His bilingual performance may simply be a courtesy, or a way of recognizing her limited capacity. “Il piove” is, after all, a fairly basic |
|and even banal remark. The owners use of two languages may also mark a kind of social distinction between him and the maid, who will appear soon, and perhaps |
|does not speak English with any ease. Whatever the case, a series of statements expanding on the wifes liking him follow his comments on the weather. |
|The six straightforward declarative sentences all beginning with “She liked” record her appreciation of his “dignity,” “the deadly serious way he received any |
|complaints,” “the way he wanted to serve her,” and finally “his old, heavy face and big hands” (129-30). Coming after her affirmation of the owners identity, |
|this final description can be seen as the physical embodiment of his Old World identity. She does not see him as decrepit; rather there is, to her interpretive |
|imagination, a sense of monumental solidity to his age and a sense of physical strength and capacity in the big hands. |
|The narrator tells us that “liking him” the wife opens the door to look outside and contemplate her quest for the cat (130). Perhaps slightly distracted by all |
|her liking for the hotel owner, or perhaps her compassionate ardor somewhat cooled by the rain now coming down harder, she seems tentative and hesitant. Her |
|thoughts now are not on the “poor kitty” out in the rain but on keeping herself from the rain. “Perhaps she could go along under the eaves” (130). We contrast |
|her initial confident energy (“No, Ill get it.”) with this tentative fragility. Its significant that we dont see her actually venture outside until the maid |
|opens an umbrella for her. The maid, we are told, speaks in Italian, but her speech is given to us in English. “`You must not get wet, she smiled, speaking |
|Italian” (130). |
|When the wife and the maid walk on the gravel path to the table where the cat was, it is gone and the wife “was suddenly disappointed” (130), giving the first |
|clear indication that her concern is not entirely for the cat but rather with possession of the cat. The maid says, “Ha perduto qualche cosa, Signora” (130). |
|(2) Because we have already had a glimpse of the womans empty marriage, this question resonates with the womans personal situation. But, as the cultural drama|
|unfolds, a vibrant, secure European asking this question of an insecure American takes on an even larger significance, metaphorically hinting that the American |
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